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How much will workers’ compensation pay for a worker’s death?

On Behalf of | May 25, 2022 | Workers' Compensation |

The majority of workers’ compensation claims in Texas have to do with worker injuries. Someone hurt on the job or diagnosed with a medical condition because of the work that they do can report the issue to their employer, file a claim for benefits and get both treatment and disability pay. 

A small number of workers’ compensation claims are the result not of injury but instead of death. If a worker has a fatal accident or develops a terminal illness because of chemical exposure on the job, their surviving dependent family members can claim certain death benefits. 

What does Texas workers’ compensation offer grieving families? 

Families can receive wage replacement and other compensation

Typically, families trying to adjust to the sudden loss of a loved one will need to replace the income that that individual provided for the family. They will also need to cover medical expenses that person had before they died and funeral costs as well. 

Workers’ compensation will typically fully cover medical care required because of a job-related injury or illness. Family members can expect full coverage of job-related medical care even if an employee dies.

Wage replacement will depend on what someone earned and the current average wages in Texas. In 2022, the maximum amount available for death benefits per week will be $1,058. At most, the surviving family members of the deceased individual can receive up to 75% of what their loved one earned. Workers’ compensation will also offer up to $10,000 to cover burial, cremation or other funeral expenses.  

Getting the maximum benefits possible can help families replace the income they have lost and reduce the hardship they will suffer because of their recent tragedy. Learning more about what workers’ compensation can offer your family and help you cope with a very trying time in your life.

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